About

What’s up with the name?

Long story short, I am deaf. I got a cochlear implant when I was ten. No, my parents didn’t ask me for my input. No, I don’t resent them for it. No, it’s not a cure, and yes, it does help.

The title comes from a late-deafened British member of Parliament, Jack Ashley, who got a cochlear implant in his 70’s. He described the sound as “a croaking dalek with laryngitis,” and the phrase stuck with me. Coming up with unique URL names is ridiculously difficult, so I’m copping this one while it lasts.

No, I haven’t seen Dr. Who yet, and yes, I plan to watch the series.

OK, so what’s up with this blog? 

Well. Most deaf kids are raised with sign language or spoken language– which are often referred to as manualism or oralism respectively (quit snickering)– or a combination of both. Now me, I grew up with Cued Speech. Because it’s not terribly commonplace, there are a lot of misconceptions out there about it, so I started blogging to sort all that out. Over time, I expanded to general d/hh issues.

Cued Speech? What’s that?

Cued Speech is one of those things that is just difficult to explain because nobody has a frame of reference for it; it doesn’t neatly fit into any one box. The way I try to explain it, whilst floundering all over myself (“no, it’s not sign language, yes, it uses the hands but it’s not sign language, no, it’s not visual phonics, I don’t know why they’re different, they just are, no, you don’t need to voice it, yes, it represents sound but you don’t need to SAY it…”), is this:

Cued Speech is a system of visually representing the sounds of spoken language in conjunction with lipreading. It’s got eight handshapes, with about three consonants per handshape, and four movements/placements with three or four vowels per movement/placement. They’re arranged so that sounds that look the same on the lips are assigned to different handshapes– for example, /m/ goes on handshape 5, while /b/ goes with handshape 4 and /p/ with handshape 1. As you mouth/voice the words, you put the cues together like a puzzle, and presto! Cued Speech.

There are plenty of sites out there that explain it far better than I ever could, and they have video too. The National Cued Speech Association is a good place to start: http://www.cuedspeech.orgCueEverything has an excellent collection of damn near every Cued Speech video out there, at http://www.cueeverything.com.